Swiatek is increasingly #1, exceeding 10,000 points. Jaber II at an altitude of 5000

In Italy under the rule of Borgias for thirty years, there were wars, terror, murders and massacres, but Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and the Renaissance came out of it. in Switzerland They had fraternal love, five hundred years of democracy and peace and What did they produce? cuckoo clocksse Orson Welles Today he rewrote the text of “The Third Man” to the above caustic line could add “Roger Federer‘, Michelangelo Tennis Who announced his decision to retire from competitive activity.

In addition to the return of Archbishop Ursino to Rome after a long exile (that was the year 367 AD, Wikipedia source), so September 15 will be remembered by posterity as the fifth of May for tennis.

“…So hit, agape the ground at the embassy“And with all due respect to Alcaraz – born on May 5th – and to his colleagues”…He does not know when such a footprint will be trampled by a deadly foot, its bloody dust.”.

Federer will take the field (maybe only in doubles? Severin Luthi also raises suspicions) in London from September 23-25 ​​for the Laver Cup, after which the curtain will fall on his brilliant career. Thus, Federer’s last official result in an open tournament will be 6-0 suffered At Wimbledon Central in 2021 against Hurkacz, showing it in this world There is no justice and if there is it is incomprehensible to us mere mortals.

From September 26 onwards, the world of tennis fans will be divided between those who have the good fortune to experience his exploits in real time and those who will have to content themselves with hearing them. The writer will tell his grandchildren that watching Federer’s play live was like seeing dolphins swimming in the sea.

We have no doubt that tennis will survive Federer’s departure as he survived the retirements of Laver, Borg, McEnroe and Sampras. But Will we survive? The answer is on May 5th:Future generations will rule.”

Waiting to find out, let us devote ourselves to the festivities of the late Gaul (athletic), conscious of the dangers involved in these festivities. “laughter will bury youYoung people in ’68 told their confused middle-class parents. We hope we will not be treated the same way by our readers. Even the most ardent fans of Djokovic and Nadal know that “Beauty” and “Federer” are an inseparable couple.

We touch it softly and begin the celebration of the Swiss master by quoting a famous line from John Keats’ poem “Ode on a Greek Urn”:Beauty is truth, truth is beauty, That’s just on the ground you know, that’s enough.” If anyone knows a better way to describe the gist of Federer’s game, please let us know.

let’s stay Keats; If you ever happen to visit a non-Catholic cemetery in Rome, stop in front of his tomb where the poet wanted to inscribe the following words: “Here lies a man whose name was written on the waterHe was wrong. His name has not disappeared like foam on water and Federer’s name will not follow that fate.

It will have happened to you, too. You don’t have the music in mind, but, like us, to dazzle you with the inexhaustible variety of technical and tactical solutions included in the kaleidoscopic game Federer, an artist who is able to create a haiku tennis game with a racket and a ball and at the same time eliminate games that have already been wontook his fans from a state of absolute euphoria to a state of absolute panic, as he is known as Defeats stay in the heart much longer than victories.

For this reason, Federer’s game has often been reminiscent of the verse of Walt Whitman, the father of American poetry, who wrote of himself: “Am I contradicting myself? Well, yes, I am against myself. I am wide. I contain multitudes (From the poem “I sing about myself”). And the What a bigger contradiction than losing a Wimbledon final at 38 After getting a score of 8-7 40-15 against the world number one? A defeat so terrible that it is paradoxically wonderful.

We can continue this quotes game indefinitely, starting with David Foster Wallis che ne “Tennis as a religious experience‘, devotes a chapter to Federer’s ambiguous devotion and then moves on to Rod Laver, of which he said:Play tennis the way you play tennisBut we will risk repetition and believe that we have already achieved our goal: to declare our love and gratitude to Roger Federer for giving us twenty years and more of his immense talent.

However, we have kept one last quote in reserve for the conclusion that may perhaps give a bit of hope to those who still cannot give themselves peace. It’s the title of a song by Franco Califano. Here it is: “I do not rule out a return.”